40 thoughts on “in passing (haiga)

  1. I like the counterpoint of the gorgeous and epic image and the tiny moment of the haiku – any small crumbling can feel like a major event if it’s you who’s crumbling..

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  2. Pingback: ‘Usa e Getta’ – Wordleing – April 24, 2015 | Bastet and Sekhmet's Library

    • I may have been in a (slightly / very) bad mood when I wrote this 😛
      So many incredible formations – and sharp-edged downpours too. Yikes!
      Glad you liked it 🙂

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        • The thing that gets me and remember I haven’t lived in the States since I was very young, is the way people are totally exposed to the weather … here we live in stone houses, which doesn’t mean there aren’t tragedies .. a flood or an earthquake are just as terrifying. But the thought of how the wind can total a town in a few minutes like in Missouri a couple of years ago .. now that’s scary! That’s what came to my mind when we were in Venice living in one of those trailer type bungalows …

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        • And on top of that, they’re no more than siding, plasterboard and insulation on a wooden frame! I’ve watched them pull up those houses … talk about the three little pigs!

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        • Exactly … so not surprising when up comes a hurricane or tornado and there’s tragedy … scary really when you think about it. And they are so ephemeral too. Living in Europe one really gets a sense of things built to last, though I think in certain areas they are beginning to imitate the Americans, as in all else.

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        • Nah … don’t. The world has been trying to copy the Americans for decades … I’ve been here for 5 of those decades … and in the end they’ve adapted a lot of American ways of doing things, more often than not choosing the worst stuff at other times taking some of our good ideas and making them worse. LOL

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        • And I can appreciate some of the thought process – really – but – I don’t entirely understand it. Why go cheaper / flashier / faster. 😦

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        • I think, oddly enough, because it’s cheaper/flashier/faster … more for less … more attractive in a tinselly sort of way … and instant if ephemeral satisfaction.

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        • Tinselly is a great word for it — and yet — here, we crave that Old World feel — at least, to visit and enjoy and reminisce about 😉
          We dont’ want to sink the money into “long lasting” though – and at this point, the economy would collapse if we did. So. What to do?

          Too bad the mindset has been embraced so widely though 😦

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        • I know what you mean … when I visited the States, i noticed that love of retro that spoke of the longing for something more than a ‘usa e getta’ (use and throw-away) society. If we started building in real brick again … you know, I think one of those paste board houses would actually cost far less than what they sell for … there is a lot of greed around, only natural that it would be embraced by a world society that wants to make a fast buck. The world economy is floundering anyway … it would be interesting to see what would happen if someone started toting quality and not quantity – maybe in the future.

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        • Such mixed messages, right? Longing for the past; throwing junk into the future.
          So SAD how we emphasize quantity and flash – in our “planned obsolescence” society. 😦

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        • Yes it really is. Being born in the 50s I’ve seen how everything has actually gotten cheaper and more disposable in all senses of the word – this last acceleration – the internet/computer age is really the dream come true of the consumerist economists … a computer can often be considered obsolete in about a year .. if it lasts that long.

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      • I’m finding word counts still tie me up in knots sometimes. It’s good to know an expert like you has ditched the rule book. I think I might have to do that too. 🙂

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        • Chevrefeuille did a nice prompt about this not too long ago — had us write a 5/7/5, a 3/5/3, and a freestyle haiku. It seems like as long as you’re shooting for five-ish / seven-ish / five-ish you’re doing okay. But even then, he said, don’t lose the beauty and meaning of the haiku just because of syllable count. Very liberating! 🙂

          [And I’m not an expert by any means, but thanks for the compliment!!!] 🙂

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