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jeetyet?
yinz set down
i’ll red up a bit –
underneath the bills

a cherry blossom tablecloth

 

Carpe Diem
Vernacular

“Jeetyet” = “Did you eat yet”.
A standard greeting around mealtime.

“Yinz” = “you-all”
Literally, “you-ones”

“Red up” = “tidy up”

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Welcome to Peeay!

True Peeay Stereotypes
(Whoopie Pie and Yinz.  Duh.)

Things People from Peeay Have to Explain to Out-of-Towners
(Sheetz. And hunting season IS a holiday.  
Try to get your car repaired on opening day.  Can’t be done.)

Ten More Things about Peeay
Birch beer is awesome.  Really.

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14 thoughts on “jeetyet?

  1. Why oh why would anyone dream of changing a town’s name from Noodle Doosie?? That’s beautiful – I’d think I was living in a cartoon if I came from Noodle Doosie 🙂

    And after that whistle stop tour of the quirks of you Peeay folks I’m fairly confident I could pass for a native on my very first visit. So, thanks for sharing!

    And Batman was filmed in your neck of the woods? Who knew..

    Like

    • Yes, while I was in Pittsburgh I saw some of the tracks used for filming action scenes at the top of a skyscraper — very cool!

      I think you’re right – there needs to be a Noodle Doosie cartoon! 🙂

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    • You can certainly tell western Peeay ve. eastern Peeay! Mom was western and dad was easterm … sp we we were i the middle as kids! I drink pop (eastern ) but slide into youinz and warsh and a lot of easternisms… lol

      thanks bastet

      Liked by 1 person

      • I’m not even from Peeay and I say warsh as do most many of my generation in the Southern Illinois St. Louis area. A few years back we did a conversation on the Mid-West, Appalachian and Midland accents .. it was very cool.

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        • Yes, “warsh” has a pretty wide range … and we seem to be right at the intersection of Midland & Appalachian in Central Peeay. With a bit of general weirdness thrown in 😉

          Liked by 1 person

        • I love language and it’s follies. English is such a cool language for weirdness … it’s spoken now on all seven continents and most of the islands and each group has added it’s own ingredient. Italian is interesting too because of it’s massive regional dialects and pronunciation in an area the size of Florida … plus what their immigrating decedents have created and saved, because I’ve heard people speaking Roman or Sicilian dialects that haven’t been heard in century!

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        • Yep, pretty much the same thing and if American emigrated around who knows, we might find antebellum New Yorkese in Chins or Italy. As it is our “American” English has a lot of the old colonial English in it – including some of our spelling and grammar rules. If you like this sort of thing Mother Tongue is a very interesting book on the English Language. 😉

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